The Baltimore Museum of Art Phases II and III

About

THIS PROJECT

The Baltimore Museum of Art Phase II project was comprised of renovating the original building, constructed in 1929, and the East Wing, added in 1982. The overall project scope included:

  • Major MEP upgrades
  • Updating the existing building automated system
  • Adding fire protection to each renovated space
  • Structural preservation of the original building
  • Refinishing multiple gallery spaces
  • Main east lobby entrance

Features unique to the project include:

  • Bluestone paved sculpture pedestal
  • Structural framework to display Tiffany & Co. glass work
  • Monumental marble staircase and custom wood ceilings
  • Extensive plaster restoration

PROJECT OVERVIEW

LOCATION:
Baltimore, Maryland
Mid-Atlantic

CLIENT:
Baltimore Museum of Art

0
1929

BUILDING ORIGINALLY CONSTRUCTED

0
100

FOOT SKYLIGHT REPLACEMENT

0
73,000

SQUARE FEET

Both the design and construction had focus on protecting, preserving and highlighting several of the building’s historic features. This included the restoration and recreation of numerous plaster rosettes, various repairs to the building’s structural walls and ceilings, and the refurbishing of three chandeliers, which included the fabrication of bronze chains and other decorative features.

Phase II won the following awards:

  • 2015 – Building Congress & Exchange Craftsmanship Award for Plaster
  • 2015 – Building Congress & Exchange Craftsmanship Award for Drywall
  • 2017 – AIA Excellence in Design Award

Phase III renovations consisted of improvements to the Thalheimer and May galleries. The project took place in a fully occupied museum and consisted of critical infrastructure upgrades, including roof replacement and skylight alterations, lighting system replacement and related controls, pre-action fire suppression system and fire alarm, WiFi cabling, camera cabling, poured and polished topping slabs, finished walls, painting, and mechanical and structural modifications. Removal of certain walls created a more open, flexible space for visitors to review a wider range of work. The project also included work to the adjacent Meyerhoff Auditorium, which received safety improvements and miscellaneous repairs.

The project also included replacing 100 LF of the building’s skylight, protecting the entire area between demolition and new install. This was a panelized system not a frame and glazing operation. The project also included removal of the existing skylight and filling it with structural steel, concrete and a new roof.

Careful

CONSTRUCTION

The project entailed the complete removal of a two-story, concrete-encased, steel staircase that was located within 15 feet of a hung gallery. This work was performed after numerous planning meetings with the curators, structural engineer, demolition contractor and Whiting-Turner. Vibration mock-ups were coordinated and performed with the input and real time feedback of the museum’s preservation team. The area was contained and outfitted with negative air to prevent dust migration. The stairs were isolated from the overall structure to minimize vibration and supported before wholesale demolition began. The work was performed while the museum was closed to preserve the visitor experience. The result of this carefully executed plan was the staircase’s complete removal within four hours.

Project

GALLERY

Museums, Zoos and Aquariums National Leader
Christopher Moore
410-337-5702
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